Tag Archive: ubuntu


Peek a Boo!

My development machine here at Hi Tech being, well, low end, had been driving me crazy. Eclipse used to take eons to build (even by eclipse’s notorious standards), and rviz used to choke and sputter on my point clouds. Highly annoying.

My incessant pleas were soon enough heard and I was given access to a mean development rig, resplendent with a SSD and all the fireworks. The caveat being that I could only access it over the network – which meant a simple ssh -X command to access the bountiful resources. Not an issue, right? Wrong.

Turns out that ssh -X only routes drawing calls to the client, which means that all the rendering is done locally. So, although I could avail of the (marginally) better build times (remember, it’s eclipse, SSD notwithstanding. Immovable leviathan wins), I was back to square one.

My first tubelight moment was to try using vnc, and after some fiddling around managed to set up in my previous post (in this post. Looked great, and I could finally access the desktop remotely, with the screen frame buffer being sent across my low latency network. I happily run Gazebo only to see –
Missing GLX on Screen :0

As with all things linux, it really couldn’t have been such an obvious solution. This error occured because xvnc does not handle OpenGL calls to the screen. At this point I suddenly remembered my long tussle with bumblebee on my laptop, and looked up virtualGl, and sure enough, it seemed to be the panacea. So, I downloaded virtualGl binaries from their sourceforge page, and followed the user guide to install virtualGl.

Minor modifications:
1. From 11.10 (Oneiric) onwards, the default window manager is lightdm, and so instead of stopping gdm, service stop lightdm
2. After doing this, also rmmod nvidia if you have nvidia drivers installed. Unload the corresponding drivers for ati (fglrx?)
So, having installed the virtualGl binaries on both the server(remote machine) and the client(your terminal) and after configuring vglserver_config on the remote machine, relogin to the remote machine using vglconnect [userame]@[ip address], and voila! Everything will be setup by vglconnect. All you need to do then to execute any GL application is to prefix a vglrun to the command, e.g. I use vglrun rosrun rviz rviz.

So what goes on behind the scenes is that virtualGl loads a helper library whenever you call vglrun. This nifty little hook sits in the memory, and redirects all GL calls to and from the vglserver, which draws it onto the required buffer. So the application doesn’t even get to know what’s really going on. Neat, huh?
As a parting shot, here’s glxgears, running in it’s full ‘glory’.

Screenshot of VGL working over the network

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xvnc

Situation: You need to access a powerful linux machine remotely from another remote machine, with everything running on the remote machine (unlike a ssh -X, in which objects are rendered on your machine), while someone else is *already* working on that machine and doesn’t want to be distrubed.

Solution :
1. Install vncserver on remote machine, vncviewer on client
2. For the host machine running gnome and metacity window manager (e.g. ubuntu, fedora), edit ~/.vnc/xstartup to be something like this

#!/bin/sh

# Uncomment the following two lines for normal desktop:
#exec /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc

[ -x /etc/vnc/xstartup ] && exec /etc/vnc/xstartup
[ -r $HOME/.Xresources ] && xrdb $HOME/.Xresources
xsetroot -solid grey
vncconfig -iconic &
xterm -geometry 80x24+10+10 -ls -title "$VNCDESKTOP Desktop" &
unset SESSION_MANAGER
gnome-session&
metacity&

(Thanks to http://forums.fedoraforum.org/archive/index.php/t-201885.html )
3. On host machine, run vncserver. A first time setup will run you through a password you want to assign
It’ll then start a vncserver. e.g. at New 'X' desktop is OCUPC:1
OCUPC being host name, and :1 the screen the server is attached to
4. On client machine, run vncviewer . Ta-da!

Range find(h)er!

So the past few weeks I’ve been working on this really interesting project for creating a 3D mobile car environment in real time for teleop (and later autonomous movement). It starts with calibrating a 3D laser rangefinder’s data and a monocular camera’s feed which allows me, after the calibration is done, to map each coordinate in my image to a 3D point in the world coordinates (within the range of my rangefinder, of course). So, any obstacles coming up in the real world environs can then be rendered accurately in my immersive virtual environment. Now since everything’s in 3D the operator’s point of view can be moved around to any required orientation. So, for instance, while parking all that is needed to be done is to shift to an overhead view. In addition, since tele op is relatively laggy, the presence of this rendered environment gives the op a fair idea of the immediate environment, and the ability to continue along projected trajectories rather than stopping for resumption of connection.

So, as the SICK nodder was taking some time to arrive, I decide to play around Gazebo, and simulate the camera, 3D Laser rangefinder and the checkerboard pattern for calibration within it, and thus attempt to calibrate the camera-rangefinder pair from within the simulation. In doing so, I was finally forced to shift to ubuntu (Shakes fist at lazy programmers) which, although smoother, isn’t entirely as bug free as it is made out to be. So, I’ve created models for the camera and rangefinder and implemented gazebo dynamic plugins within them to simulate them. I’ve also spawned a checkerboard textured box, which using a keyboard manipulated node I move around the environment. So this is what it looks like right now

Screenshot of w.i.p.

So here, the environment is in the Gazebo window at the bottom, where I've (crudely) annotated the Checkerboard, camera and Laser Rangefinder. There are other bodies to provide a more interesting scan. The point cloud of the scan can be seen in the rviz window in the center, and the camera image at the right. Note the displacement between the two. The KeyboardOp node is running in the background at the left, listening for keystrokes, and a sample HighGui window displaying the detected Chessboard Corners at the top Left.

Looks optimistic!